Organic growth

Organic growth

Search Engine Optimization or “SEO” took its first steps in the early 90’s, when the first websites emerged on the Internet and the competition between them to attract traffic began. Search engines then saw the light of day to help structure and make the web more accessible. The first search engine, Wandex, started in 1993, and was created by the World Wide Web Wanderer, a robot developed by the MIT. In 1994, WebCrawler (1994) was released, the first complete search engine that allowed users to search for words on any web page. Others followed, such as Lycos, Excite, Infoseek, Inktomi, Northern Light, Altavista and Yahoo!

In 1996 Larry Page and Sergey Brin launched a search engine project, called BackRub at the time, which eventually became Google. The arrival of Google meant a radical change in the way search engines worked, as it began to organise searches based on the relevance of the contents of each website in the eyes of the users themselves, thus prioritising the results that users considered most relevant to a specific topic. PageRank was then created, a set of algorithms that assessed the relevance of a website by assigning it a numerical value from 0 to 10.

This whole structure led to SEO as we understand it today, which, according to Rand Fishkin, co-founder of Moz and one of the most respected voices in the field, is “the practice of increasing the quantity and quality of traffic obtained through organic search engine results”. Organic growth is closely related to SEO, since it is achieved through a set of techniques or actions aimed at increasing traffic to a website by improving its positioning in different search engines.

Organic growth also in social media too

The Internet is a “living being” in constant motion and evolution. This is why, after SEO, Social SEO has emerged. Its main objective is to achieve impacts based on content published on the web and properly optimized so that it can be shared on social media. This promotes a good positioning and, also, a greater engagement with the brand.

But there is more: social media are gaining followers every day and attraction formulas are growing at almost the same pace. It is therefore not surprising that, on many occasions, platforms such as Facebook, LinkedIn or Instagram, get away from their “mother sites” to open up markets on their own. Sometimes they even do it on their own, since many companies do not have a website, only profiles on social networks. While paid ads on these platforms are widely used, organic growth is increasingly emerging as a key strategy to encourage follower engagement.

SMOS: experts in organic growth

We at SMOS are experts in organic growth on social media channels and, therefore, we are fully aware that this has its advantages and inconveniences. In terms of advantages, using organic growth techniques on these platforms contributes to building more stable and solid social media platforms. Maintaining an open and regular dialogue with followers, in addition to improving customer service, promotes brand awareness and brand loyalty on the part of the target audience, increases trust in the product and the company and, as a result, increases sales.

On the downside, we must acknowledge that organic growth in social networks is very time consuming and requires a team with sufficient knowledge to carry it out successfully. As you know, SMOS is formed by a group of professional experts in organic growth in social media. Our techniques and engagement processes are truly unique and make the difference. If you want to boost your social channels, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Esther Alonso

Esther Alonso

Content Manager SMOS

Juliana Koch

Juliana Koch

Graphic Editor SMOS